Background:Current evidence suggests physical activity (PA) and sleep are important for cognitive health; however, few studies examining the role of PA and sleep for cognitive health have measured these behaviors objectively. Objective:We cross-sectionally examined whether 1) higher PA is associated with better cognitive performance independently of sleep quality; 2) higher sleep quality is associated with better cognitive performance independently of PA; and 3) whether higher PA is associated with better sleep quality. Methods:We measured PA, subjective sleep quality using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and objective sleep quality (i.e., fragmentation, efficiency, duration, and latency) using the MotionWatch8© in community-dwelling adults (N = 137; aged 55+). Cognitive function was indexed using the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Plus. Correlation analyses were performed to determine relationships between PA, sleep quality, and cognitive function. We then used latent variable modelling to examine the relationships of PA with cognitive function independently of sleep quality, sleep quality with cognitive function independently of PA, and PA with sleep quality. Results:We found greater PA was associated with better cognitive performance independently of 1) PSQI (β= –0.03; p < 0.01); 2) sleep fragmentation (β= –0.02; p < 0.01); 3) sleep duration (β= –0.02; p < 0.01); and 4) sleep latency (β= –0.02; p < 0.01). In addition, better sleep efficiency was associated with better cognitive performance independently of PA (β= –0.01; p = 0.04). We did not find any associations between PA and sleep quality. Conclusions:PA is associated with better cognitive performance independently of sleep quality, and sleep efficiency is associated with better cognitive performance independently of PA. However, PA is not associated with sleep quality and thus PA and sleep quality may be related to cognitive performance through independent mechanisms.

Direct Link: https://doi.org/10.3233/jad-170936

Journal: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. 2018 Jan 1;63(4):1469-84.

Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, cognitive performance, older adults, Physical Activity, Sleep,

Applications: Sleep,

CamNtech Reference: M18027

Back to Search Results

UK & International customers

CamNtech Ltd.
Manor Farm
Fenstanton
Cambridgeshire
PE28 9JD, UK

US customers

CamNtech Inc.
630 Boerne Stage Airfield,
Boerne,
Texas 78006,
USA

Copyright

© 2020 CamNtech Ltd and CamNtech Inc

Company information

Registered in England No. 2221302
VAT No: GB486 3019 34

Company information

VAT No: GB486 3019 34

Privacy Policy